Induction Cooking -We Check Out The Best Induction Capable Cookware

By Kate Hendricks | Kitchen

Jul 14
induction pots

Did you just move into a new house that has an induction cooktop rather than the standard gas or electric stovetop? Or did you buy a new boat or RV with an induction unit? If so, you are definitely going to need a cookware set that is safe and effective when cooking via this method—induction capable cookware that looks just as good as it works.

To help you with this task, below we have reviewed several of the most popular and best-selling induction capable cookware sets currently on the market, and explained some of the pros and cons associated with each item.

We have also included an Induction Capable Cookware Buying Guide,  we have outlined and defined the various factors you will need to consider—and the characteristics you will need to look for—when purchasing one of these great sets of pots and pans.

Induction Cookware Quick Comparison

Last update on 2018-08-21 at 04:37 / Affiliate disclaimer / Images via Amazon Product Advertising API

Duxtop SSC-9PC Whole-Clad Tri-Ply Induction Cookware Set

The Duxtop SSC-9PC Whole-Clad Tri-Ply Induction Cookware Set is a great set of induction capable cookware that every family should have. The set includes: an 8-inch and a 10-inch frying pan; a 1.6 quart and 3-quart covered sauce pan; a 6.5-quart saucepot with cover; and a 6.6 inch pot holder. Its whole-clad stainless steel try-ply design is unique in that eliminates hotspots and ensures even heat distribution along the bottom and up the sides of the pan.

The heavy lids on the pots and pans in the Duxtop SSC-9PC Whole-Clad Tri-Ply Induction Cookware Set help to reduce vibration; and the stay-cool stainless-steel grip handle is fastened to the cookware using heavy duty rivets. The set includes a life-time warranty and can be used on a variety of different cooktops.

Pros

  • Rolled rims. The rolled rims on the Duxtop SSC-9PC Whole-Clad Tri-Ply Induction Cookware Set make for easy pouring.
  • Heavy Lids. The heavy and heavy-duty lids help to reduce the vibration that can often come from induction cooking.
  • Dishwasher/Freezer Safe. The cookware is dishwasher and freezer safe and can stand heats up to 550 degrees.

Cons

  • Not very heavy duty. The cookware in the Duxtop SSC-9PC Whole-Clad Tri-Ply Induction Cookware Set is not very sturdy-feeling.
  • Shorter lifespan. This cookware set is not as durable as some of the other sets on our list.
  • Can discolor over time. Some reviewers have had problems with the pans becoming discolored over time.

Magma Products 10 Piece Gourmet Nesting Cookware Set

Designed exclusively for use on induction cooktops, the Magma Products 10 Piece Gourmet Nesting Cookware Set features a 100 percent 18/10 stainless-steel mirrored finish, and encapsulated triple-clad bases that ensure even heat distribution regardless of the dish being cooked. The 10-piece set includes 3 sauce pans (1-1/2 quart, 2 quart, and 3 quart) with interchangeable lids; a stock pot (5 quart); and a sauté / fry pan (9-1/2 inch diameter) with interchangeable lids; in addition to two removable handles and a convenient storage cord.

The Magma Products 10 Piece Gourmet Nesting Cookware Set is completely oven and dishwasher safe. Thanks to the included bungee cord, the products secure easily for convenient storage in a space less than a half cubit foot.

Pros

      • Three saucepans. While other sets of this kind are limited to two saucepans, the Magma Products 10 Piece Gourmet Nesting Cookware Set includes three saucepans of various sizes.
      • Flat-milled bottoms. The flat-milled bottoms on these pots and pans ensure even heating throughout.
      • Easy storage. The cookware set will not take up a lot of room in your cupboards or pantry.

Cons

      • Lids not very heavy. The lids on the Magma Products 10 Piece Gourmet Nesting Cookware Set are not very heavy and can hence vibrate during cooking.
      • Lid handles get very hot. Cooks would be wise to use pot holders, as the lids on this cookware can get extremely hot.

Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Piece Cookware Set

The Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Piece Cookware Set is designed with two tough layers of stainless steel encapsulating a heavy gauge aluminum core. This unique design translates to cooking that is very fast and even. The cookware set includes an 8-inch and 10-inch omelet pan; a 1-1/2- and 2-1/2-quart covered sauce pan; and a 6-quart covered stock pot, all with heavy duty lids that do not vibrate during the cooking process.

Dishwasher and oven safe, and triple riveted to ensure secure handles, the Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Piece Cookware Set is one that every owner of an induction cooktop should have.

Pros

      • Stylish. The cookware in the Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Piece Cookware Set is both sleek and stylish.
      • Heavy duty lids and secure handles. Made extremely well, the accessories on these pots and pans are built to last.
      • Satin-finished interiors. The satin-finished interiors of the pots and pans is a nice touch.

Cons

      • Food can stick. Many reviewers have noted that the food tends to stick on the Calphalon Cookware.
      • Handles can get hot. The handles on the Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless Steel 8-Piece Cookware Set can get fairly hot.

Induction Capable Cookware Buying Guide: Factors to Consider When Buying

If you recently switched, or you plan to switch to an induction cooktop, you will definitely need some induction capable cookware to go along with it. However, before you go out and buy your new cookware, take some time to read the following Buying Guide, in which we will cover some of the factors and characteristics you should consider before making a purchasing decision.

Is the Cookware Magnetic?

The most important thing you need to know about an induction cooktop is that it uses magnetic fields to produce the required heat. That being said, it is crucial that your new cookware is compatible to the magnet—and not all metal cookware is magnetic.

Cookware made from magnetic materials like cast iron, steel and magnetic stainless steel, which contains some amount of iron to make it magnetic, tend to work well with induction cooktops. Some ceramic pans may also be induction cooktop capable, but only those ceramic pots and pans that are clad-based. In a piece of clad-based ceramic cookware, an iron layer is hidden beneath the ceramic layer making the base of the pot or pan magnetic. In fact, any pot or pan that has an iron base—or some other metal base that is magnetic—is induction cooktop capable.

What Is the Best Material for Induction Cookware?

Actually, any piece of cookware that is magnetic will work with an induction cooktop, but some tend to work better than others. Here we will look at just a few examples of the best materials used to make induction capable cookware.

Stainless Steel

As we mentioned above, stainless steel that has a little iron in it makes for great induction cooktop cookware, but not all stainless steel pans offer the same high quality. Budget stainless steel cookware tends to cook very unevenly, so you may have to pay a little more to get a high quality pan. 18/10 stainless steel is a good example of a quality material in induction cookware. Many makers of this type of cookware go further by adding an aluminum or copper core to the stainless steel cookware, which not only makes a steel pan safe but also helps with even cooking.

      • Aluminum Encapsulated Pan. Aluminum is a wonderful conductor of heat, and when it is encased by stainless steel the heat distribution only improves. In these pans, the aluminum core traps the thermal energy in the pan-base, and prevents heat dissipation through the air.
      • Copper Core Pan. Some cookware comes with a copper core to facilitate even heating. The copper core is sandwiched with the aluminum or stainless steel. Copper offers better heat distribution than aluminum and steel. It can distribute the heat evenly throughout the pan base, and hence it facilitates even cooking. However, keep in mind that any type of copper core will probably drive up the price of the cookware

Cast Iron

Cast iron is highly magnetic and thus works great with induction cooktops. It is also a great non-stick option once the pot or pan has been properly seasoned and cared for.

Carbon Steel

Flat-bottomed carbon steel pans work great with induction burners, and the material also offers natural non-stick features. You can use carbon steel fry pans & skillets for sturdy induction cooking in a pan that weighs much less than cast iron.

Note: Stoneware and Graniteware can also be used with induction cooktops, provided it includes a metallic base of some kind.

Does the Cookware Have a Flat Bottom?

Flat-bottoms are essential on any piece of induction capable cookware, as this feature not only makes them cook more efficiently, but also makes them much safer to use. Remember, induction cooktops feature smooth-touch flat surfaces made of glass or high-grade composites. As a result, the bottom of the pan needs to be flat to produce the proper amount of magnetism needed to produce the desired heat.

About Lids and Pot Handles

When shopping for induction capable cookware, be sure to take note of the lid, particularly its weight. At high induction power, lighter lids can vibrate intensely and may even fall off, causing the contents to spill over and creating quite a mess and racket. Heavier lids are much more suitable for this type of cooking.

The handles on the pots and pans should also be very securely fastened—not loose in the slightest. If they are not tight, they can also vibrate at high power and create an annoying din.

Non-Stick

When shopping for induction capable pots and pans, try to select sets in which the cookware is non-stick by nature or has been treated with some type of non-stick coating. This can save you from hours of scraping after cooking some dishes.

Dishwasher Safe

Induction capable cookware that is dishwasher safe is another big time-saver. Keep in mind that not all pieces of this cookware are safe to put in the dishwasher, so you will need to read the fine print.

Warranty

Last but not least is the warranty—when and if it is offered. Induction capable cookware tends to be pricier than that which is used on other types of cooktops. Therefore, it’s important that your new set of cookware comes with a full warranty in the event any pieces break or fail to work on your new stove.